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Marketing Literacy

Stream Summary: 

Listening to your audience is the single most important rule of marketing – important because it helps you use scare resources wisely, and most important because the audience tells you what to do if you listen to what they need.

Marketing is simply listening and then acting accordingly.

Know your issue or program statistics and how they impact society or your local community. Tweet every day about your organization’s success. Say your elevator speech to someone new at every event you attend.

If you are limited by resources, do not feel you have to do it all. Choose a single marketing tool (just one!) and become excellent at it.

Workshops listed here can assist literacy practitioners and administrators with the challenging task of marketing. While some presenters offer literacy data that can be shared via marketing efforts, others share tips for how to effectively communicate marketing messages.

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Presenter(s): 
Jody Lundrigan, Jim Carfrae, Anthony Alfred, Simon Dingley
Session: 
106

A Roundtable Discussion on How to Market Literacy

This discussion produces instantly usable advice from a panel of marketing experts who say: decide who you are talking to, decide what you want to accomplish and make sure your public campaign has a compelling personal story. Their top advice is to be strategic in your marketing campaign and focus your efforts on a single audience.

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Session Video: 
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Presenter(s): 
Scott Murray
Session: 
206

Using Literacy Report Cards in Decision-Making

John Kenneth Galbraith noted literacy was the single most important determinant of economic progress. With the low skill supply in Canada, the government and private firms both have financial responsibility for increasing skill development in this country. In this session, Scott outlines three (3) key tools for frontline workers to use to convince decision-makers in the public and private sector to take action on literacy issues.

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Presenter(s): 
Chris Harwood
Session: 
306

Developing a learner involvement strategy strengthens the leadership skills of learners and the impact of your organization. Chris describes a learner involvement strategy, why it is important, what should be included, how they are developed and what resources are required. She explains a learner involvement strategy as painting a picture of your organization that learners can see themselves in – and as requiring the direct involvement of learners.

Quotes: 

Don’t speak for learners. They can speak for themselves.” – Chris Harwood

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Presenter(s): 
Fahim Kaderina and Norm Rowen
Session: 
406

Measures around accountability are key to program improvement, and all stakeholders (governments, practitioners, learners) want the same thing – to improve the lives of learners. In this networking discussion, a controversial dialogue surrounds the question, “Where is the data to show we are producing results and therefore deserve tax dollars?” Norm suggests the things being measured are not what funders want measured and asks, “How long will the funding continue if we do not produce the results funders want?”

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Presenter(s): 
Dr. Sarah Eaton
Session: 
606

Dr. Sarah Eaton explores how to create effective marketing for literacy on a small budget. Taking you through different topics such as: how to create a marketing mindset, ways to polish your program, how to generate awareness, and how to spend  your marketing money wisely, Dr. Eaton shows how literacy professionals can market themselves or their organization effectively, as well touching on some popular topics in nonprofit marketing.

Session Video: 
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Presenter(s): 
Karen Coutts and Melissa Alers
Session: 
706

How to Effectively Communicate Your Message

Clear writing is a way of presenting material that is easy for people to read and understand. Layout, visual construction, amount of text as well as the words themselves are important to conveying your message. Karen and Melissa outline how producing clear writing or plain language documents benefits readers of all levels and are easy to produce when you keep a few simple rules in mind.

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Session Video: 
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